Donating = Loving

It takes so much time to research, write and edit the stories and videos in this blog. If you do find any joy in going through them, please consider supporting the author with a donation of any amount - anything from buying him a cuppa to treating him to a good dinner. How about that?


Thuita's 3rd Law of Human Nature

This is Uncle Ndonga watering his vegetable garden with his son. The photo was taken in the late '90s or early 2000s.


Uncle Ndonga (yes, the one I have mentioned in the caption of the photo above) is my Mum's brother who stayed with us here at home in Kiserian when my brothers and I were growing up in the '90s. His work was to look after us and assist in farming activities. He left home sometime in 2001 when I was in Standard 8, after staying with us for more than a decade. And I think he left because my parents were unable to continue paying him for his work and services.

I remember Uncle Ndonga as a handsome young man in those days he stayed with us at home. He was also a hard-working and a skilled farmer who grew such vegetables as kales, spinach, cabbages, tomatoes and corianders with admirable zeal and professionalism. I particularly recall the way he meticulously made props for tomato plants using threads from sacks. He would then water the tomato plants and spray them with chemicals to prevent diseases and to ward off worms.

Sometimes, Uncle Ndonga would ask me to help him out in spraying his tomatoes with chemicals using a hand-operated pump. Being the submissive boy that I was, I obliged. And despite the fact that I was a small boy, Uncle Ndonga would let me do the pumping with my hands - a laborious task - while he sprayed the tomatoes. I vividly recollect getting exhausted one afternoon as I operated the pump.

Besides good looks and farming prowess, the other thing I remember Uncle Ndonga for was his swagger. He used to refer to tea as "diesel", which he loved drinking. When going to my hometown of Kiserian, which is about three kilometres from home, he would boast that he was flying to New York. And he liked referring to his room as "State House". I came to like that kind of swagger.

For reasons not clear to me now, I loved Uncle Ndonga in those days he stayed with us. Like sometime in the year 2000 when he was jailed for two or three days for slapping a certain woman, I deeply sympathized with him and hated the woman who had had him jailed. I remember rehearsing in my mind over and over of myself rebuking the woman harshly. And I am sure I would have rebuked the woman given the chance but as it turned out, I didn't get to meet her at that time.

As much as I loved Uncle Ndonga, I have to say that I didn't like the way he was fond of pinching and slapping me - something I didn't see him do to my senior brothers. He would pinch or slap me for such minor issues as asking him what we were cooking for lunch in the presence of his friends. He made my boyhood days gloomy with such kind of admonitions and punishments.

One afternoon in 1999, I got fed up with Uncle Ndonga's punishments. That afternoon, I was boiling a pot of githeri in the kitchen when Uncle Ndonga came and removed the pot from the fire so that he could warm his lunch. When I told him not to remove the pot, he pinched me. And lo! I lost my temper and reacted to him angrily. Then I went ahead to threaten him that I would report him to my parents for sins he had committed when I was a small child. In my anger, I went to his vegetable garden and uprooted several tomato plants.

Well, I didn't report Uncle Ndonga to my parents as I had threatened him. And the following Monday as I walked to school, I felt guilty for confronting him so angrily. But at least I shall ever remain grateful for reacting angrily because after that incidence, Uncle Ndonga never pinched or slapped me for the remaining three years that he stayed with us at home.

When Uncle Ndonga left home sometime in the year 2001, my eldest brother Joe Kagigite remarked that we would never have another worker as good as Uncle Ndonga. I can't recall what I thought of Joe's remark; all I remember is me telling Joe in Kikuyu, "Yes, he was good because he wasn't pinching or slapping me." But I didn't let Joe know of how Uncle Ndonga had ceased punishing me after I angrily confronted that afternoon I have told you about.

That tactic of stopping people from bullying me by confronting them has worked a few more times in my life that I have come up with what I call the Thuita's 3rd Law of Human Nature which states as follows:
If people realize you are weak and gullible, they will keep on bullying and cheating you until you make them realize otherwise.
This law teaches us that keeping quiet when people are bullying and cheating us is not the best way to deal with them; that only encourages them to do it more. Instead, we should show people we can think for ourselves by confronting them as soon as they bully or cheat us. That's all I am saying.

***********************
FEEDBACK: Would you be so kind as to offer your feedback on the stories I post in this blog? Just click on the "Feedback" link on the menu at the top of this blog and share your thoughts with me. Thanks in advance for your comments.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Sharing is Caring

Like this story? Then share it on:

Donating = Loving

It takes so much time to research, write and edit the stories and videos in this blog. If you do find any joy in going through them, please consider supporting the author with a donation of any amount - anything from buying him a cuppa to treating him to a good dinner. Thanks to everyone who is contributing; you rock!

Thuita's 2nd Law of Human Nature

This is me in my den holding Norman Vincent Peale's The Power of Positive Thinking . More about it in the story below.


Norman Vincent Peale wrote an enlightening book titled The Power of Positive Thinking (see photo above). I have read it thrice in the past nine years. When I re-read the book for the third time this year, I found myself wishing I was as knowledgeable as Norman Peale.

In the book, Peale exhorts us to believe in the Bible and memorize verses from it. He also encourages us to pray regularly and to have faith in ourselves and in our abilities. It's in so doing that we can be constantly happy and transform ourselves into popular likeable persons.

I am thinking that Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States who led his country to Cold War victory, must have read The Power of Positive Thinking because he was a living example of all that the book expounds. Reagan was a charismatic president who believed deeply in God, loved meeting people and thought that all the solutions to problems facing civilized man today can be found within the covers of the Bible.

And guess what! I was surprised to learn that Peale and Reagan, the men I have briefly mentioned above, were hated by some people. One politician said in the 1960s that "St. Paul is appealing but Peale is appalling."

Then another politician said in 1984 that he "would rather have Roosevelt in a wheelchair than Reagan on a horse."

Not only was I amused by those hateful remarks on those two heroes of mine but also felt in good company because I have also been through the fire of vile comments. Like when I started sharing my stories on social media after falling in love with writing, I was discouraged by the negative statements some people spoke of me.

Imagine taking time to craft a riveting story by carefully selecting the right words from my thesaurus and sharing with my friends in the hope of entertaining them only to receive a feedback saying, "Thuita was a nuisance; I unfriended him on Facebook."

Reflecting on those negative remarks has led me to formulate what I call the Thuita's 2nd Law of Human Nature which states as follows:
You will never be liked by everyone no matter how good you try to be.
This law teaches us intuitively that enemies are part of life. As for me, I consider it my job to like people; not to get others to like me. So I like you. If you like me too, that means I am constantly in your heart. But if you hate me, that means I am constantly in your mind.

*************
FEEDBACK: Would you be so kind as to offer your feedback on the stories I post in this blog? Just click on the "Feedback" link on the menu at the top of this blog and share your thoughts with me. Thanks in advance for your comments.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Sharing is Caring

Like this story? Then share it on:

Donating = Loving

It takes so much time to research, write and edit the stories and videos in this blog. If you do find any joy in going through them, please consider supporting the author with a donation of any amount - anything from buying him a cuppa to treating him to a good dinner. Thanks to everyone who is contributing; you rock!

← Newer Stories  ||   Older Stories →