Positive Quote For Today

"The only way that we can live, is if we grow. The only way that we can grow is if we change. The only way that we can change is if we learn. The only way we can learn is if we are exposed. And the only way that we can become exposed is if we throw ourselves out into the open. Do it. Throw yourself."— C. JoyBell C.



The Real Devil Worshippers



Back in the '90s when I was a small boy in primary school, I used to hear stories about the Devil and his worshippers. The Devil was portrayed to us as an ugly man with horns like those of a cow, with teeth like those of a cat and with nails like the claws of an eagle - a very grisly figure that must have left us wondering why anyone would want to worship him. From those stories, I heard it that devil-worshippers become wealthy in a short time. What I wasn't told is where that wealth comes from and how the Devil bestows it.

In those days, there was this owner of a big mansion on the foot of Ngong Hills who was rumoured to be a devil-worshipper. Though the mansion was not far from where I lived, I never got to know its owner but I came to believe the rumours that he was a devil-worshipper.

One afternoon in the late '90s, I joined a gang of altar boys from the Catholic Church where I worshipped who headed to the mansion to shame its owner for worshipping the Devil. We went there courageously and enthusiastically. Guess what happened?

Well, we began to lose courage and enthusiasm when we neared the mansion. We kept going to and fro on the road that led to the mansion till we finally gave up on our mission. So went back to our homes without having talked to anyone in the mansion.

It has been a long time since I last saw that mansion because I don't frequent those sides where it is located. And I have never ascertained whether the rumours I heard in the '90s (that its owner was a devil-worshipper) were true or malicious slander.

I have also never got to know whether they are indeed some people who worship the Devil since I have never come across a devil-worshipper. But I am thinking that devil-worshippers probably exist, only that they are afraid of making themselves known to the world. Tell me, who would want to be known as a devil-worshipper?

And if devil-worshippers exist, I am wondering why anyone would want to turn to the scary Devil for help while the God I worship promises us in His Word that He rewards those who love Him with health, wealth and peace. I am also wondering how devil-worshippers act as they go about their daily business. Are they kind or hateful? Are they generous or mean?

It could be that the so-called devil-worshippers are more cheerful, more loving, more generous and more hard-working than some of us who worship the Almighty God. That leads me to think that those who bow down to worship the Devil are actually worshipping God, only that they refer to their God as the Devil. What is in a name anyway? A rose by any other name would still smell the same. Similarly, God by any other name still remains the same.

So in a sense, the real devil-worshippers are not those who bow down to pray to the Devil. The real devil-worshippers are those who do acts of evil such as lying, stealing, putting others down and shedding innocent blood. What I am trying to say is that stealing is worshipping the Devil; so is lying, putting others down and shedding innocent blood.

Going by my interpretation of devil-worshipping, you will agree with me that this world is full of devil-worshippers; as in, people who do evil. We encounter them in our day-to-day activities. And we read about them in the newspapers. People who are conning others, defiling minors, raping women and terrorizing residents. We are living in a fallen world that is full of devil-worshippers.

As for me, I have resolved to resist the Devil by doing what's right such as loving myself, telling the truth and encouraging others. I will also resist the Devil by confessing whenever I sin. Already, I have repented of all the transgressions I did in the past.

My dear reader, I also beseech you not to worship the Devil by doing what is evil. Resist him with all the strength you can muster and turn to God by walking uprightly. Be kind to others and to yourself as well; tell the truth at all times and keep good company. That's all I am saying.

***********************************
RECOMMENDATION: If you've enjoyed this story on the real devil worshippers, you might also enjoy another one I wrote some time back on "Growing Our Faith in God". Just click on that link in blue to dive straight into the story.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Sharing is Caring

Like this story? Then share it on:

Donating = Loving

It takes so much time to research, write and edit the stories and videos in this blog. If you do find any joy in going through them, please consider supporting the author with a donation of any amount - anything from buying him a cuppa to treating him to a good dinner. Thanks to everyone who is contributing; you rock!

Abuse of Power

With permission, I have extracted this picture-quote from the Twitter page of Tim Fargo. All rights reserved worldwide.


As I have narrated before in this blog, I used to sneak out of school early on Sunday mornings in 2006 when I was in Starehe Institute. I did that so as to be on time for the 8.00am church service of my hometown Catholic parish where I enjoyed the company of the youths in the church.

One Sunday in 2006 when I was away from Starehe, the students had trouble singing the school song which I regularly accompanied on the piano. That made my absence from Starehe to be felt, and when I went back to the school, some captains threatened me that they would report me to Mr. Joseph Gikubu, the then acting director of the school, for sneaking out of school on Sundays.

I can't remember ever feeling afraid of the threats from the captains. All I recall is that the issue died down after a few days and I continued sneaking out of the school on Sunday mornings. I was such a daring student.

Apart from sneaking out on Sundays, another offence I used to commit when I was in Starehe Institute was failing to report back to the school on the official opening day of each term. I would prolong my holidays by four or five days. Like in January 2007 when I didn't report back to Starehe on opening day, a classmate of mine in the institute named Jamlick Kogi kept asking me via internet when I was going to join him at school.

While relaxing at home that same January 2007 after failing to report back to school as expected, I heard on TV during lunch time news that Starehe had a new director. His name was Prof. Jesse Mugambi. And he sounded eloquent as he addressed journalists about his new role as the director of the school where I was pursuing my education.

After I finally reported back to Starehe Institute that very same January of 2007, I decided to stop sneaking out of school on Sundays without permission. So I approached one of the priests of my hometown Catholic parish where I attended church and explained to him my predicament.

And wow! The priest turned out to be very understanding. He wrote a letter, requesting the director of Starehe to grant me permission to join youths in his church on Sundays. He began the letter by saying, "Greetings in the name of Jesus Christ..." And as he wrote the letter, he informed me that he had read some books by Prof. Jesse Mugambi, the director of Starehe to whom he was addressing the letter.

The following day, I presented the letter to Prof. Jesse Mugambi who consulted his deputy before granting me permission to be leaving Starehe on Sundays. He printed a note that said he approved my absence from Starehe on Sundays. I showed the note, which had the stamp of Prof. Jesse Mugambi, to my house captain.

You know what? A few weeks after he granted me permission to be leaving Starehe on Sundays, Prof. Mugambi began to act tough on Starehe Institute students. He contemplated expelling from the institute some students who had failed their accounting exams. And when he found some institute students sleeping during class hours, he told us that "if you have nothing to do, don't do it here."

Then when the KCSE results were released around March 2007 of which Starehe emerged top, some students of Starehe Institute who had excelled in the exams dashed to their homes without permission to celebrate their exemplary performance - something I had also done the year before when I scored an 'A' in those mighty exams. After those four gruelling years of study in high school, it felt natural to want to dash home to rejoice on success in the exams, much in the same way footballers pause matches to celebrate whenever they score.

On learning that some institute students had gone home to celebrate their KCSE results, Prof. Mugambi was not impressed about it. He issued the students with threats when they came back, summoned their parents to the school for interrogation and expelled quite a number of them from the institute - including my friend Richard Kagia who was active in the Christian Union movement.

That time Kagia and his fellow students were being put to task for going home to celebrate their KCSE results, I felt very safe and secure to have a note that granted me permission to be leaving the school on Sundays. Given how Prof. Mugambi was acting tough on Starehe Institute students, I wonder what would have happened to me if I had continued sneaking out of school on Sundays without permission and a captain breathed a word about it to the new director. It had been very wise of me to acquire that note.

Coming to think about it, I am of the opinion that Prof. Mugambi just created a storm in a teacup by the action he took on the institute students who dashed home to celebrate their KCSE results. As in, he overreacted. Had I been the director of Starehe at that time, I would have organized a bash for the students at the school canteen.

"Guys!" I would tell the students during the bash, "You have done us proud. Thank you so much for having preserved the good name of Starehe with your spectacular performance in the KCSE exams."

And then towards the end of my congratulatory speech, I would conclude, "But guys, now KCSE stuff is over. I want you guys to concentrate on your courses in the institute with the same zeal you did for KCSE. Okay?"

By so saying, I would have boosted the morale of the students, unlike Prof. Mugambi who demoralized them by issuing them with threats, summoning their parents to school and expelling those who didn't comply with his instructions.

Prof. Mugambi just created a storm in a teacup for shizzle. Or to put it in other words, he killed a mosquito with a gun because he ended up causing more harm by messing up with the lives of the students who were relying on Starehe Institute for their education. He also denied Starehe the talents of such dedicated students as Richard Kagia who was skilled at soloing traditional Agikuyu folk songs.

To put it bluntly, Prof. Mugambi's action on the institute students amounted to an abuse of power - the kind that has impoverished some African nations after they gained independence from their colonial masters. With all the negative media coverage on Starehe in recent years due to the school's decline in KCSE performance, I am sure the current administration of the school would give anything to reclaim the glory that the likes of Richard Kagia were expelled for.

****************************
RECOMMENDATION: If you've enjoyed this story on abuse of power, you might also enjoy another one I wrote sometime back on "How My Captain Helped Me". Just click on that link in blue to dive straight into the story.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Sharing is Caring

Like this story? Then share it on:

Donating = Loving

It takes so much time to research, write and edit the stories and videos in this blog. If you do find any joy in going through them, please consider supporting the author with a donation of any amount - anything from buying him a cuppa to treating him to a good dinner. Thanks to everyone who is contributing; you rock!

← Newer Stories  ||   Older Stories →